Monday, 8 March 2010

Why Things Happen

~ Demonstration page using content deployed to the Icodeon Common Cartridge Platform ~

A hammer falls to the ground, nobody falls off continents in the southern hemisphere, and the Earth continues to orbit the sun.

In physics during the 17th century, Isaac Newton described a single Law of Gravity that explained why all these things happen.

But why does a candle burn, and not a rock? Why does iron rust and not gold? And why does water stay at 100 degrees even when you continue to keep heating it up? Why do these things happen?

In chemistry, scientists have decribed Laws of Thermodynamics - that explain why these types of things, these chemical processes, happen.

We might think that we know what everyday words such as temperature, heat and energy mean - but scientists in the 18th and 19th century had to work hard to define these concepts precisely.

The links below introduce some of these fundamental ideas in thermodynamics. These links are for Lesson 1, from a course of 3 lessons in physical chemistry.



In everyday life we might use words such as temperature and heat to mean the same thing - but in thermodynamics the two words have different, and very precise, meanings.

Check your understanding of scientific meaning of the word heat with these questions:



The lesson plan for this page ("Thermodynamics") was developed at The Faculty of Computer and Information Science at Ljubljana in Slovenia (http://www.fri.uni-lj.si).

3 comments:

  1. The lesson plan for this page ("Thermodynamics") was developed at The Faculty of Computer and Information Science at Ljubljana in Slovenia (http://www.fri.uni-lj.si).

    This page contains material from Lesson 1 - the first of three lessons for high school students.

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  2. Just tested Q2. What happens after submitting it? No next questions?
    Pascal.

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  3. The course on Thermodynamics was prepared by The Faculty of Computer and Information Science at Ljubljana in Slovenia - and on the subject of "Heat" only two questions were provided.

    IMS Common Cartridge supports assessments - which are collections of questions. Each assessment may have one-to-many questions - and in this case, the assessment has only two questions.

    Another resource - see "Great Britain" has an assessment of 3 questions, and the page "The Psychology of Faces" has about 10 questions.

    The number of questions is a decision for the content author, and/orthe instructor.

    ReplyDelete